‘I trac’d him too and fro’: Walking the Neighbourhood on the Early Modern Stage

Rebecca Tomlin

Abstract


This article considers the ways in which plays stage the negotiation of the relationship between public and private space in early modern London through characters walking in the city. It uses concepts developed by Michel de Certeau and Pierre Mayol to think about the twentieth-century city to argue that Heywood’s Edward IV and the anonymous A Warning for Fair Women present walking the streets of London as an act of recognition and knowing that distinguishes those who belong in the city from those who do not.


Keywords


neighbourhood; walking; space; early modern;London; stage; drama; Edward IV; Warning for Fair Women

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12745/et.19.2.2841


Rebecca Tomlin
ORCID iD University of Cambridge
United Kingdom

Dr Rebecca Tomlin (rct48@cam.ac.uk) is a research associate on the Crossroads of Knowledge in Early Modern England: The Place of Literature, an ERC funded project at CRASSH and the faculty of English, University of Cambridge.